People and cultures, like the arts, traditions and cuisine born of those cultures, come in all flavors, and so do cars. The great thing about global trade is that we have choice in nearly everything we buy. Few, if any, people are forced to purchase a product because no alternatives built by rival companies exist. And, because we’re not living under the thumb of an oppressive apparatus that demands us proles buy dismal crapboxes from a sole state-owned factory, our driveway diversity is off the charts. Maybe yours tops them all. Sure, there’s some notable absences. All Chinese-brand cars, for instance. Brands like Seat and Skoda and Holden and Opel and Daihatsu and the PSA Group lineup (for now), Hindustan, and vehicles built at AvtoVAZ factories in Russia. There’s plenty of vehicular nationalities we can’t get our hands on. Old rarities sometimes float across the oceans, and a person’s advanced age (or globe-trotting career) can mean a now-unattainable brand once passed into their ownership, either here or abroad. Sadly, your author can’t claim a diverse ownership history of various auto nationalities. Nope, just two countries: America and Japan. No Germans, no Italians, no Sw...